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Baby’s saliva can predict tooth decay, study finds

By: RUBY NYIKA, www.stuff.co.nz Schools are banning all drinks except for milk and unflavoured water in an effort to quell rampant rates of tooth decay amongst young children. But the ban is proving too late for many children, with one primary school principal saying far too many of his students are arriving for their first day with rotting teeth. The solution may be found in a new study which has discovered saliva samples taken from the mouth of 1-year-olds can predict future decay. The study was led by New Zealand-born professor Mark Gussy, an oral health professor at Melbourne’s La Trobe University, who said visiting a dentist by the age of two might be too late. Gussy said some infants…

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Oral health: These 6 foods can whiten your teeth naturally

By: Nupur Jha, www.ibtimes.co.in Yellow teeth are a major turn off; it’s something everyone wants to avoid. Various reasons cause yellow teeth, which can range from unhygienic oral health maintenance to excess consumption of food or beverages that leave your teeth pigmented. Not taking proper care of the teeth can cause teeth caries leading to tartar, cavities, etc. Using too much of chemicals on the teeth might cause damage. Hence, adapting natural ways to combat the yellowness and resurrecting the whiteness is the best thing to do. Here are some foods which you can include in your diet to maintain the whiteness and shine along with a beautiful, healthy smile: Nuts Nuts comprise of proteins, which aid in teeth whitening….

Bright smile from the Dentist's Chair

Five habits you should avoid if you want healthy teeth

By: www.startsat60.com If you think that in order to maintain great dental hygiene all you need to do is brush and floss each day, you might want to think again. As it turns out there are several everyday habits that could be putting your chompers at risk of decay, cracking and the erosion of enamel. If you want to ensure your teeth remain in the best possible shape, dentists recommend you cut out the following habits: Biting your nails It might seem like a harmless nervous habit, but biting your nails can chip teeth and place strain on your jaw. According to the Colgate Oral Care Center and the American Dental Association, if you bite your nails, chew on pencils…

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Sugary sports drinks ‘raise the risk of obesity, diabetes and tooth decay’

By: http://dailytimes.com.pk/ The majority of teen-agers risk obesity and heart disease by drinking supposedly healthy sports drinks, experts warn. Some 68 percent of children drink sugar-packed sports drinks at least once a week, according to research by Cardiff University. Few consume them to improve sporting performance, despite the fact they are sold as energy-boosting exercise drinks. Instead, half are drinking the heavily-marketed products for ‘social reasons’. Children are attracted to the products’ sweet taste, low price and availability. Experts last night warned that the high sugar levels and acidic content increases the risk of obesity, type-two diabetes, heart disease and rotting teeth. A 500ml bottle of Lucozade Sport, for instance, contains 18g of sugar – equivalent to four-and-a-half teaspoons –…

zollipops

Zollipops Offer Sweet Relief While Being Healthy for Teeth

  By: www.foodprocessing.com Zollipops were created by Alina Morse, an innovative young girl in Michigan who was inspired after a trip to the bank with her dad. When the teller offered her a sucker, dad quickly reminded Alina how sugar can be bad for your teeth. Having watched her father take several innovative products to market, Alina became determined to follow in his footsteps by developing a candy that contributes to good oral health. The result was Zollipops, the “After You Eat Treat,” the company’s trademarked slogan. One sucker can be enjoyed after every meal or sugary snack, up to three pops per day. Based on xylitol, erythritol, stevia and other smile-friendly natural ingredients, Zollipops are formulated to restore a…

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Healthy smiles begin with healthy habits

By: www.chieftain.com Healthy, beautiful smiles start when your child is an infant. Healthy habits need to begin early in life so they continue throughout a child’s life. And without attention and care, infants and toddlers can develop serious and painful dental disease. The most common cause of tooth loss in children is not accidents or injuries — it is baby-bottle tooth decay (BBTD), a pattern of severe and rapid tooth decay in infants and toddlers that results from improper feeding practices. Every time your infant or child consumes sugary or sweet liquids, the acids produced by the plaque attack the baby teeth. After many attacks, cavities may begin to form. The teeth most susceptible to BBTD are the upper front…

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17 brilliant uses for toothpaste… that don’t involve your teeth!

  By: www.startsatsixty.com Toothpaste is such a common object in our house that we can often forget how useful it can be – it isn’t just a teeth cleaner! It’s actually an awesome cleaning aid, as well as a stand in for creams, beauty products and other expensive pastes. Here’s some of our favourite ways to use toothpaste, do you have any others to add? 1. Clean your iron Irons get built up grime over time, so to clean them, use a non-gel toothpaste to gently remove the gunk. Make sure the iron is cool and turned off at the power point. Wipe off and polish. 2. Polish your diamond rings Who needs expensive ring cleaners when you have toothpaste?…

Woman hands putting toothpaste on toothbrush

Keep your toothbrush clean, and other teeth tips

By: Kim Glover, http://www.union-bulletin.com Sometimes the most useful information is not found in a textbook. Here are several of the more useful dental tips I have come across during my years as a dental hygienist — including one to prevent “brain freeze.” Maybe one will help you. Keep toothbrushes separate — Your toothbrush most likely won’t make you sick if you keep using it after having a cold or flu. The University of Rochester Medical Center says you are unlikely to become reinfected by your toothbrush. After recovering from an illness, your immune system has learned how to neutralize that particular virus or bacteria. However, each person should make sure their toothbrush does not touch anyone else’s brush when it…