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Dr. Lisa Feldman

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What is a pediatric dentist?

By Dr. Laura Adelman and Dr. Rachel Rosen, www.clevelandjewishnews.com Does your child hate going to the dentist? What if you could find a specialist who makes it fun and easy? While many general and family dentists treat young kids, a pediatric dentist has specialized skills and training that will provide a positive oral health care experience and help set your child up for a lifetime of healthy teeth. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentists states children should see a pediatric dentist when their first tooth erupts or by age 1, whichever comes first. Starting dental visits this young can greatly improve a child’s chances of remaining cavity-free. It also helps establish a dental home between caregivers and dentists to help…

Portrait of a young girl sitting in a dentist's chair giving a thumbs up

Experts Asking Parents To Be More Active In Preventing Tooth Decay In Kids

BY DIANE MTETWA , www.moms.com Tooth decay can happen when the enamel of your tooth gets destroyed. If a tooth experiences enough decay, it can lead to cavities, which can be painful and then need to be treated. Cavities are something that many adults dread, but as a parent, taking your child to the dentist for a sore tooth may seem like an awful fate; one that you hope can be alleviated seamlessly. A major dental trial, conducted recently, looked at a variety of ways which tooth decay can be treated and you may not be surprised by their findings. It may seem as if the obvious is being stated, but during this study, researches were able to conclude that…

candy

With sugar season beginning, here‘s the cavity rating for popular candies

By Sarah Lindenfeld Hall, https://dailystockdish.com Your kids may be consuming a boatload of candy at the moment, thanks (or no thanks) to their Halloween take. But not all candy is created equal. The offers up this candy survival guide, which you might want to follow if you plan on popping a piece or two in their lunch box. It might just keep your kids cavity-free during this season of sugar — which seems to run from Halloween to Easter. Chocolate Chocolate is one of the most popular Halloween candies. Did you know it’s probably one of the safest, too? Chocolate dissolves quickly, and washes off your teeth easier than other candies. Dark chocolate is your best bet, as it contains…

floss

What is the Correct Way to Floss Teeth?

By: https://www.mysuburbanlife.com Good oral hygiene is an important component of a person’s overall health. In addition to brushing teeth twice a day, using mouthwash regularly, and getting regular checkups with your dentist, flossing will help keep teeth clean and healthy. Flossing removes plaque and food particles from areas where a toothbrush can’t easily reach, including under the gum line and between teeth. Because a buildup of plaque can lead to tooth decay, gum disease, and even tooth loss, daily flossing is strongly recommended. Dental floss is made from either nylon (multifilament) or PTFE (monofilament). Nylon floss may be waxed or unwaxed, and is available in a variety of flavors. It can shred when used between closely connected teeth since it’s…

habit

6 Terrible for your teeth foods a dentist wants you to stop eating

By: ERIN BUNCH, https://www.wellandgood.com If eyes are the windows to your soul, teeth are a surprisingly accurate window to your overall health. And the health of your pearly whites is mostly correlated to their maintenance. It takes quite a bit of diligence to keep them looking and feeling sharp (so to speak). Brushing, flossing, tongue scraping, and regular professional cleanings aren’t enough to keep your teeth in excellent condition. What you do to maintain a healthy smile is just as important as what you don’t, according to dentists. Avoiding certain foods and drinks that can damage your teeth is crucial. (See also: smoking/vaping, but I don’t need to tell you that, right? Right?!) Consumption of the wrong things can cause…

preg

Why your teeth need extra care during pregnancy

By: FIONA WRIGHT, https://www.nowtolove.com.au Your teeth and gums need special attention during pregnancy, so it is recommended that you book in to see your oral health professional between the fourth and sixth months of your pregnancy. Hormones produced by your body plus an increased metabolism and blood supply during pregnancy can increase the risk of dental decay and issues with gum disease so it’s important to maintain an effective oral hygiene routine. Look after your teeth and gums Maintain healthy oral hygiene habits by brushing morning and night with a fluoridated toothpaste, cleaning between teeth daily, eating a diet low in sugars and acidic foods and drinks, and visiting your oral health practitioner regularly. Suffering from pregnancy sickness? Dietary cravings,…

teething

Teething 101: 4 Pediatrician-Approved Ways to Sooth a Teething Baby

By: https://health.clevelandclinic.org You finally got your baby’s sleep routine on lock. So when you tiptoe out of your sleeping infant’s nursery, you foolishly think you’re home free. Think again! Your baby’s cutting a tooth, and there’s seemingly nothing you can do about it. “You’re spared the first one to three months, but after that, the teeth just keep on coming,” says pediatrician Ei Ye Mon, MD. If you find yourself in the teething zone — which occurs anywhere between 4 months old and around 2 years old — you don’t have to be stuck there. Dr. Ye Mon gives her best teething remedies so you and your baby can live your best life, one tooth at a time. Signs your…

juice

Dentists declare fruit juice just as bad for teeth as soft drink

By: Laura Barry, https://www.bhg.com.au Everyone knows that soft drinks and cordial should be consumed in moderation. However, it appears that fruit juice isn’t quite the healthy alternative to these flavored drinks we thought it to be. In fact, dentists from the School of Dentistry at University of Queensland have declared fruit juice to be just as bad for your teeth as Coke or Fanta. Sugar is found in high concentrations in most flavored and fizzy drinks, and excessive consumption of sugar can cause health and tooth decay problems for all people, regardless of age. However, it isn’t just the sugar causing all the dental problems. As it turns out, sugary drinks and fruit juices both contain acids, and these acids…