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Close-up of little boy opening his mouth during dental checkup

Fighting cavities without a dentist drill

By: Melanie Falcon, www.wfmz.com Not many people look forward to going to the dentist, especially children. Now, there’s a new liquid doctors are using to fight cavities painlessly, without a drill. Just ask Uriah’s mom how much they both hate the dentist’s office. “Crying, screaming, running, don’t want you to look in his mouth,” said Andrea Webb. But those nightmarish appointments may be just a bad memory, even for someone with cavities, thanks to a new liquid called silver diamine fluoride. It’s been used in other countries for decades, but it was only recently approved by the FDA for the United States. It’s marketed as advantage arrest. Here’s how it works: The liquid desensitizes the tooth. The anti-microbial properties also…

baby

Baby Your Baby: Oral Health for Babies

BY LESLIE TILLOTSON, www.kutv.com Good oral health starts by creating a routine with your child – before they even have teeth. This includes not putting baby to bed with a bottle, and remembering to wipe their gums with a clean washcloth during bath time. “Start brushing teeth once that first tooth pops through,” says Dr. Carly Sorenson, Pediatrician at Central Orem Pediatrics. This should be done using a small toothbrush with fluoride toothpaste. If your child is under the age of three, use a grain of rice sized glob of toothpaste; over the age of three, toothpaste should be pea sized. Another way to protect baby’s teeth is to introduce a sippy cup at six months and get rid of…

Young boy in a dental surgery

A Cavity-Fighting Liquid Lets Kids Avoid Dentists’ Drills

By CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS, www.nytimes.com Nobody looks forward to having a cavity drilled and filled by a dentist. Now there’s an alternative: an antimicrobial liquid that can be brushed on cavities to stop tooth decay — painlessly. The liquid is called silver diamine fluoride, or S.D.F. It’s been used for decades in Japan, but it’s been available in the United States, under the brand name Advantage Arrest, for just about a year. The Food and Drug Administration cleared silver diamine fluoride for use as a tooth desensitizer for adults 21 and older. But studies show it can halt the progression of cavities and prevent them, and dentists are increasingly using it off-label for those purposes. “The upside, the great one,…

teeth-1

Why Do Teeth Hurt?

By: Tia Ghose, www.livescience.com That gnawing, throbbing pain, the sharp jolt from a cup of hot coffee — almost everyone alive today has experienced the intense pain of a toothache. But why exactly do we get toothaches? In short, it is because, unlike hair or nails, teeth are made up of living tissue, said Christine Wall, an evolutionary anthropologist at Duke University who studies the evolution of teeth. Pain is the brain’s way of knowing something has gone wrong in the tissue, she said. “Under the cap of enamel, there are two other layers that are living,” Wall told Live Science. Those living tissues are threaded with nerves that send signals to the brain, when encountering hot and cold foods,…

toothbrushes1

Women change their toothbrush twice as often as men

By STEPHEN MATTHEWS, www.dailymail.co.uk Woman change their toothbrush twice as often as men, a shocking new survey reveals. They replace their brush or electric head every 92 days while men stick with theirs for almost twice as long – an average of 185 days. It means that men are using the same brush on average for six months, potentially risking the health of their teeth and gums. Dentists recommend brushes be changed every three months to maintain optimal dental care. The results come from a survey of 1,000 patients by Carisbrook Dental in Manchester – one of Britain’s leading private dental practices. They found that 57 per cent of women are now using electric toothbrushes to clean their teeth –…

baby

How To Protect Baby’s Teeth From Tooth Decay

By Diana Kohnle, www.health.usnews.com/ Tooth decay stemming from sugary drinks stored in baby’s bottle can lead to a host of long-term dental problems. The American Dental Association suggests how to protect baby’s teeth: Never place soft drinks, juice or sugared water in a baby’s bottle. Only use the bottle for breast milk or formula. Never let baby take a bottle to bed. Don’t put baby’s spoon or pacifier in your mouth. This will prevent transferring germs and bacteria. Never dip a child’s pacifier in anything sweet. Wipe your child’s gums with a damp, clean cloth after feedings. When teeth erupt and up until age 3, brush gently with a toothbrush and a rice grain-sized portion of fluoride toothpaste. From ages…

cranberries

6 Benefits of Cranberries to Health: Teeth Protection, Cancer Buster and More

By: www.foodworldnews.com At only 46 calories with 12 grams of carb and 2 grams of sugar a cup, the phytonutrient-rich cranberries have so much to offer to human health and well-being. To make the most of this wonder berry, consumption of fresh cranberries is best. Anti-Inflammatary As an anti-inflammatory agent, cranberries may help in easing rheumatoid arthritis and problems in the digestive and cardiovascular systems. It also protects the vessel walls. Anti-UTI (Urinary Tract Infection) Cranberries are a well-known remedy for UTI. Because of their rich content of the antioxidant proanthocyanidins, cranberries prevent UTI-causing bacteria from lodging into the urinary tract walls. Anti-Ulcer Stomach-ulcer causing Helicobacter pylori may be prevented from lodging into the stomach lining by consumption of cranberries…

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Kid-Friendly Oral Health: To Eat or Not to Eat

  By: Frankie Rendon, huffingtonpost.com Within recent years, dentists have reported an alarming influx of children — sometimes even as young as 18 months — suffering from tooth decay or gum infection. Often, these conditions require invasive surgery, resulting in the loss of numerous baby teeth. The statistics are nothing to smile about. In 2014, Australia’s Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne indicated that, of the 1,000 minors who underwent general anesthetics for tooth removal, 178 were aged three or younger. In light of this startling fact, parents have begun wondering — what is the main culprit of early childhood dental issues, and how can they be avoided? Typically, the answer lies in today’s pervasive high sugar diet. Kid-proven favorites like…