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Experts Asking Parents To Be More Active In Preventing Tooth Decay In Kids

BY DIANE MTETWA , www.moms.com Tooth decay can happen when the enamel of your tooth gets destroyed. If a tooth experiences enough decay, it can lead to cavities, which can be painful and then need to be treated. Cavities are something that many adults dread, but as a parent, taking your child to the dentist for a sore tooth may seem like an awful fate; one that you hope can be alleviated seamlessly. A major dental trial, conducted recently, looked at a variety of ways which tooth decay can be treated and you may not be surprised by their findings. It may seem as if the obvious is being stated, but during this study, researches were able to conclude that…

candy

With sugar season beginning, here‘s the cavity rating for popular candies

By Sarah Lindenfeld Hall, https://dailystockdish.com Your kids may be consuming a boatload of candy at the moment, thanks (or no thanks) to their Halloween take. But not all candy is created equal. The offers up this candy survival guide, which you might want to follow if you plan on popping a piece or two in their lunch box. It might just keep your kids cavity-free during this season of sugar — which seems to run from Halloween to Easter. Chocolate Chocolate is one of the most popular Halloween candies. Did you know it’s probably one of the safest, too? Chocolate dissolves quickly, and washes off your teeth easier than other candies. Dark chocolate is your best bet, as it contains…

dentist

New liquid treatment stops tooth decay painlessly

By: WENCY LEUNG, www.theglobeandmail.com A few weeks ago, an Edmonton dentist received her first shipment of a new, non-invasive treatment for tooth decay called silver diamine fluoride. When applied to an affected tooth, the liquid treatment stops decay by killing cavity-causing bacteria, then remineralizes, or hardens, soft spots in the tooth, eliminating the need for drilling and filling. So far, Roche has tried it on about a dozen patients, some as young as five. But she already believes it “really revolutionizes the care” for children, seniors and other patients who don’t tolerate dental procedures well. “You just paint it on like a little bit of varnish … no freezing and drilling. It takes a minute to apply this material,” said…

toothbrush

The truth about your toothbrush- It’s Ugly!

By: http://www.pamplinmedia.com You’ve heard it all before; replace your toothbrush every 3 months. That may be over simplifying things if you are trying to be healthy and avoid colds and infection. Did you know that some viruses and bacteria from an infected mouth can live for weeks on a toothbrush? Keeping it clean is the first thing to do. Wash it with soapy water, soak the head in your mouthwash or easiest yet, run it through the dishwasher like an eating utensil. The simple act of just rinsing it with tap water and letting it dry thoroughly will help a little, but if you have a systemic illness or immune disorder, you may want to take an extra step. If…

Close-up of little boy opening his mouth during dental checkup

Fighting cavities without a dentist drill

By: Melanie Falcon, www.wfmz.com Not many people look forward to going to the dentist, especially children. Now, there’s a new liquid doctors are using to fight cavities painlessly, without a drill. Just ask Uriah’s mom how much they both hate the dentist’s office. “Crying, screaming, running, don’t want you to look in his mouth,” said Andrea Webb. But those nightmarish appointments may be just a bad memory, even for someone with cavities, thanks to a new liquid called silver diamine fluoride. It’s been used in other countries for decades, but it was only recently approved by the FDA for the United States. It’s marketed as advantage arrest. Here’s how it works: The liquid desensitizes the tooth. The anti-microbial properties also…

soda

The dangers of sugary drinks

By: www.southcoasttoday.com Today children and even adults are consuming a large amount of sugary drinks. Some companies are able to camouflage the dangers by making them sound like they are good for us. Even some flavored waters that claim to contain vitamins in them have several teaspoons of sugar. Sugary drinks pose a serious health concern: childhood obesity. Children consume large amounts of sugar everyday through drinks, snacks, candy, and even in items such as ketchup. There is an epidemic today of overweight children. Some children carry their weight into adulthood. Obesity in children and adults carry hefty health dangers. It’s critical to try and keep our children from becoming obese. Cutting back their sugary drinks and paying close attention…

gene

Do you have the cavity gene?

By:  www.ksat.com You’ve heard it countless times: it runs in the family. But usually, people are talking about the color of your hair or problems with your heart. However, a dental decay gene may also be something your parents have passed along to you. Six-year-old Hoxie Flowers’ mom, Jennifer, figured out a fun way to teach her son how to take care of his teeth. “It was hard in the beginning to brush his teeth, very hard,” Jennifer told Ivanhoe. Jennifer worries because cavities seem to run in her family. “He’s possibly prone like I am,” said Jennifer. Professor and Dean of Nova Southeastern University Linda Niessen, DMD, MPH, is increasingly convinced there is, in fact, a cavity gene. “Dental…

toothpaste

BRUSH YOUR TEETH! IT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE

By: Cheryl Critchley, University of Melbourne Next time you’re racing out of the house without cleaning your teeth, think again. Neglecting your pearly whites can lead to a lot more than the odd filling. It’s the simplest of actions, but brushing your teeth properly with a good fluoride toothpaste that produces plenty of white froth could save your life. The worst most of us expect when we forget to brush and floss is plaque build-up and decay. But poor oral hygiene has also been linked to a range of conditions including some cancers, cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy complications. It seems incredible, but it’s quite logical when you think about it. A healthy mouth harbors small amounts of bacteria…