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Alternative for fill and drill treatment of cavities

By: Andrea K. McDaniels, www.baltimoresun.com Heather got a big surprise when she took her 4-year-old son for a routine dental checkup — young Eli had several cavities and needed eight crowns on his back teeth. The Baltimore mom worried about her child undergoing such a complex medical treatment, which the doctor said would require general anesthesia. “I could not wrap my head around the fact that my kid would have to go through a procedure of this magnitude,” Powell said. Desperate for an alternative, Powell began searching the Internet for other options. She discovered a handful of dentists around the country who use a mixture called silver diamine fluoride to freeze cavities, preventing the infection from spreading. The clear concoction…

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New way to treat cavities is quick, painless

By: Kerry Cavanaugh, www.wbaltv.com A new way to treat cavities that’s quick and painless could be perfect for kids who can’t sit for a filling, and it’s saving families hundreds of dollars. Anniyah James was all smiles as she settled into the dental chair. Her dentist sealed the 3-year-old’s cavity in 30 seconds without a needle or a drill. The silver bullet for Anniyah is called silver diamine fluoride, a topical product that seals cavities and stops them from growing. “The silver kills the germs that are in the tooth and the fluoride helps re-mineralize the tooth so that the tooth structure is no longer soft in decay, it’s hard,” Brill said. Brill said the only downside is that the…

Parent to Parent: All You Need to Know About Your Child’s Teeth

  By: Humairah Shah, www.huffingtonpost.com Whether you’re a parent in the US or anywhere else in the world, raising your first child is invariably a steep learning curve. With so much on our plates, it’s easy for parents to overlook caring for baby’s teeth, but a few useful tips will keep us on track. Aww…the First Tooth A baby’s first tooth erupts between four to eight months of age and typically by the time he or she is two-and-a-half to three-years old, every baby tooth should have erupted. Some children have a difficult time during teething, while others sprout teeth effortlessly. When babies are teething, they tend to be droolers and often refuse to eat because their gums hurt. Excessive…

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How To Protect Baby’s Teeth From Tooth Decay

By Diana Kohnle, www.health.usnews.com/ Tooth decay stemming from sugary drinks stored in baby’s bottle can lead to a host of long-term dental problems. The American Dental Association suggests how to protect baby’s teeth: Never place soft drinks, juice or sugared water in a baby’s bottle. Only use the bottle for breast milk or formula. Never let baby take a bottle to bed. Don’t put baby’s spoon or pacifier in your mouth. This will prevent transferring germs and bacteria. Never dip a child’s pacifier in anything sweet. Wipe your child’s gums with a damp, clean cloth after feedings. When teeth erupt and up until age 3, brush gently with a toothbrush and a rice grain-sized portion of fluoride toothpaste. From ages…