Blog Home » Start your child early on a dental hygiene routine

Baby Teeth

baby

Start your child early on a dental hygiene routine

By: www.indianexpress.com Oral care is not just about having a good smile; it is also about maintaining a consistent oral hygiene to ensure good health of teeth and gums. Babies and toddlers are at just as much risk of dental decay as adults. When it comes to protecting your baby’s teeth and gums, a bit of effort goes a long way, and the earlier the better. Oral hygiene must start at the very beginning of a child’s life. Even before his or her first teeth emerge, certain factors can affect their future appearance and health. Parents should start giving attention to the baby’s oral care and prevention of cavities at an early stage. Babies with good oral hygiene stay healthier…

healthy

Five healthy food swaps

By: www.independent.ie Making simple swaps in the foods that we eat can make all the difference to our diet and motivation. When we see one easy change work, it can spark a chain reaction in our confidence and reap huge health benefits. The key to success, according to national dietetic advisor for the HSE Margaret O’Neill, is to tackle change in bite-size chunks. “Pick one change at a time,” she says. “Start with one thing and try to stick with it – we know that behaviours can take a while to change: it can take two to three weeks to bed in. “Some people will be able to cut down from five biscuits a day to one; for others, it’s…

9 TIPS TO KEEP KIDS TEETH HEALTHY

By: PerfectTeeth.com As parents we understand the importance of good dental habits and do our best to pass that onto our children. And healthy adult teeth start with healthy kids teeth! Keeping kids cavity-free is the ultimate goal, after all, poor dental health impacts more than just your pocketbook and their smiles. In fact, a California Society of Pediatric Dentistry study found: “Untreated dental disease compromises the child’s ability to eat well, sleep well, and function well at home and at school. The unaesthetic nature of untreated dental decay compromises the child’s self-esteem and social development.” Source: The Consequences of Untreated Dental Disease in Children How To Keep Kids Teeth Healthy Unfortunately, many of these adverse effects of an unhealthy…

oral health

Oral Health Optimization

By: www.naturalproductsinsider.com Many ingredients and options are available in the natural products industry scientifically proven to enhance oral health. From mouthwashes to toothpastes and ingredients such as probiotics, cranberry extract, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and more, it’s an exciting time for dental health product developers and manufacturers. Periodontal disease is of great concern among consumers due to its connection to other chronic diseases. Probiotics, specifically heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum HK L-137, play a role in decreasing the depth of periodontal pockets and improving chronic periodontitis. Other probiotics, such the Streptococcus salivarius strain, are commonly present in the mouths of healthy individuals. The Streptococcus salivarius strain possesses substances that protect against several pathogens including ones that cause strep throat, otitis media and halitosis/malodor….

baby

Baby Your Baby: Oral Health for Babies

BY LESLIE TILLOTSON, www.kutv.com Good oral health starts by creating a routine with your child – before they even have teeth. This includes not putting baby to bed with a bottle, and remembering to wipe their gums with a clean washcloth during bath time. “Start brushing teeth once that first tooth pops through,” says Dr. Carly Sorenson, Pediatrician at Central Orem Pediatrics. This should be done using a small toothbrush with fluoride toothpaste. If your child is under the age of three, use a grain of rice sized glob of toothpaste; over the age of three, toothpaste should be pea sized. Another way to protect baby’s teeth is to introduce a sippy cup at six months and get rid of…

baby teeth

Baby teeth DO matter

By: http://tvcnews.tv The Welsh Government’s ‘Baby Teeth DO Matter’ campaign was launched to raise the awareness of the importance of adopting healthy dental habits early to prevent tooth decay. The message to parents is: Children should start having their teeth brushed as soon as the first teeth come through at 6 months. Brush teeth last thing at night before going to bed and one other time during the day. Use a smear of family fluoride toothpaste, Take children to the dentist before the age of one and the whole family should be having routine dental check ups. Reduce the amount and frequency of sugary foods and drinks in diet from the weaning stage. Speaking after the visit Vaughan Gething said:…

brushing

Early care can take the bite out of dental problems later

By: Larry Wood, www.aikenstandard.com Good dental health begins in infancy, and that early attention to oral hygiene and care can mean strong teeth and gums as children become young adults and seniors. Dr. Thom Akins, a pediatric dentist in Aiken, said the earlier a child begins visits to the dentist, the better. “We like to see children earlier than most people anticipate,” Akins said. “Historically, people are accustomed to taking their children to the dentist around age 3 or 4, but as pediatric dentists, we prefer to see them within six months of the first tooth coming in or by the age of 1, whichever comes first.” During those early visits, a parent holds the child while he does an…

child

Silver Diamine Fluoride in Caries Management

By: www.ada.org A recent article in the New York Times highlighted use of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) as an alternative approach to treatment of cavities in children.1 The article highlighted that SDF was faster and cheaper than drilling and filling; and it mentioned the downside that when applied, SDF blackens the tooth. Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is a colorless liquid that at pH 10 is 24.4% to 28.8% (weight/volume) silver and 5.0% to 5.9% fluoride.2 Just as 5% sodium fluoride varnish has FDA clearance as a Class II medical device for the treatment of tooth hypersensitivity, FDA classified SDF as a fluoride and cleared its use as a Class II medical device for the same indication. A number of products…